skip to Main Content

The peace that Jesus gives

The peace that Jesus gives does not work in a vacuum. Neither is it the calm after a storm. The peace that Jesus gives is a calm and quietness of heart in the midst of a storm! It is a peace that the world cannot give.

In the last few days we have been preoccupied with the search for the peace that the world gives in the aftermath of the nation’s general election. We propose to bring it about by conquest and coercion. After we have conquered, we will convene conferences, make covenants, and appoint committees to monitor our “peace.”

History has proven that the peace the world gives is passing. It will last only as long as the resolve of the worldly men who make it. “The war to end all wars” often fails to bring lasting peace. “Peace in our time” always seems to be a thing of tomorrow … and you know that tomorrow never comes.

The peace that Jesus gives, on the other hand, is the result of a relationship with the Prince of Peace. As such, it is inward and personal. Like the fear of the Lord that is the beginning of wisdom, this peace starts with God and cannot be had apart from a personal relationship with God. It is as lasting as is our willingness to “abide in the vine” and draw peace from Christ’s spiritual supply. It is a personal peace that passes all understanding.

The peace that the world gives fails because it leaves out the Prince of Peace. There can be no permanent peace among men until men make peace with God. The vertical relationship must precede the horizontal relationship. But when the vertical is put up against the horizontal, together they form a cross, and it is through a cross that Jesus made possible reconciliation between men. “He is our peace who hath made both one!” (Ephesians 2:14).

Christ is our great example of peacemaking. Ephesians 2:14, 15 says it eloquently. “For he himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility, by setting aside in his flesh the law with its commands and regulations. His purpose was to create in himself one new humanity out of the two, thus making peace.”

The peacemaker claims no rights. He refuses to become part of the problem. He refuses to think of himself. His whole concern is the reconciliation of others, and he is willing to suffer to see it done! Jesus did no wrong … but He took the blame for the wrong we had done … thus making peace.

Jesus was a peacemaker, and He has passed on to us the work of peacemaking. “that God was reconciling the world to himself in Christ, not counting people’s sins against them. And he has committed to us the message of reconciliation. We are therefore Christ’s ambassadors, as though God were making his appeal through us. We implore you on Christ’s behalf: Be reconciled to God.” (2 Corinthians 5:19, 20). – globalchristiancentre.com

Back To Top