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denisDenis is venerated as the first bishop of Paris and the patron of France.  He is said to have been sent to Gaul by Pope Fabian and to have been beheaded at Montmartre with Rusticus, a priest, and Eleutherius, a deacon during Velarian’s persecution in 258.  Some writers wrongly identified him with Dionysius the Areopagite, mentioned in Acts 17:34, who was claimed as author of a series of works of mystical theology actually written in the fifth century.  The great Abbey of St Denis in Paris is the resting place of many kings and queens of France. – CTS New Daily Roman Missal 2012, p 3051; Vatican II Weekday Missal 1975, p 1787

 

john leonardiJohn Leonardi was born in 1542 near Lucca Italy. After training as a pharmacist, he was ordained a priest.  This allowed him to bring to people the “medicine of God,” Jesus Christ.  He founded the Clerks Regular of the Mother of God to teach Catholic doctrine to youths and adults in confused Reformation times.  Internal troubles drove him to Rome, to the friendship and guidance of St Philip Neri.  He helped establish the College of Propaganda Fidei in Rome, which trained missionaries.  He died of influenza while ministering to the Roman populace in 1609.  He was canonised in 1938 and chosen as patron of pharmacists in 2006. – CTS New Daily Roman Missal 2012, p 3053; Vatican II Weekday Missal 1975, p 1787

 

newmanJohn Henry Newman was born in London in 1801.  He was educated at Trinity College Oxford and embarked on a highly successful career as a Fellow of Oriel College and Vicar of the University Church of St Mary.  A prominent member of the Oxford Movement, he became a Catholic in 1845.  Soon afterwards he was ordained priest and introduced the Congregation of the Oratory into England.  He lived at the Birmingham Oratory, continuing his ministry as a pastor, writer and educationalist.  In 1879 he was created cardinal deacon of San Giorgio in Velabro by Leo XIII.  He died in 1890.  He was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI in 2010. – CTS New Daily Roman Missal 2012, p 3055

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